Lower Back Tattoos

On a woman’s body there are a few places that can be thought of as sensual. Although this varies from culture to culture, many consider the most sensitive areas to be the nape of the neck and the infamous lower back. With that being said, it’s really not hard to see why lower back tattoos have become so popular over the years.

Although women have several areas for tattoos, the lower back is one of the most erotic and sensual areas women can get tattooed. Lower back tattoos are easy to cover up as well, which is great for those who aren’t allowed to have tattoos at work. Unlike other areas of the body, the lower back is completely covered up by a shirt. With the lower back – you only show the tattoo off when you want.

The ease to show or hide lower back tattoos has helped to increase popularity, as well as the desire, or sensuality. When a woman tells someone, especially a man, that she has a lower back tattoo – the mind often wonders. Lower back tattoos create a sensual and tantalizing appeal. Normally, these tattoos are done around the waist line. While part of it may be hidden by a women’s birthday suit – there may very well be a part of it showing as well. For lovers, a lower back tattoo can be very sensual and sexual, a secret that is shared only between the two.

Lower Back Tattoos

Girl showing her tattoo raised her denim jacket !

The various designs and shape of the tattoo will often times enhance both the look and the appeal of the entire lower back area. The design of the tattoo is normally a small and shallow curvature that enables it to fit perfectly to the curves of the female back and natural curves of her hips. The lower back tattoo helps to accentuate an already breathtaking part of the female anatomy and enhance an area that is well known for its sensuality.

Popular designs for lower back tattoos include flowers, vines, and stars. Winged creature designs work good as well, as the wings of the monster can stretch his wings across the entire lower back region. Angels, dragonflies, and birds also seem to work quite well. You can add natural designs to the creatures as well, including plants and flowers. The lower back is a great area for tattoos – giving you unlimited possibility to use your imagination.

Although there are a lot of options and designs available, you should always choose one that you can enjoy for the rest of your life. You should always give thought to a design, and not pick something just because it’s appealing at the time. Instead, you should look into the thought and meaning of the tattoo and decide if it’s something you can see yourself with for the rest of your life. The meaning behind a tattoo is important, both now and later on in life. When you look at designs, you should always pick the one that literally calls out to you.

Before you decide to get a lower back tattoo, you should always look at several designs first, and then decide the best one for you. If you can’t find a design that you like, you can always have a professional tattoo artist design one for you. This way, you can have a tattoo design based on what you want. Although a custom design may cost a bit more money – it’s truly worth it if you want a unique and creative design that enhances the look of your lower back.

Get connected with tattoo lovers to acquire new relationships

Are you a tattoo lover interested in meeting others who have the same passion? Then, choose online dating today for accomplishing goals in your life. Because it is an excellent choice for your to connect with tattooed persons in various places across the world to establish strong relationships. A tattoo dating website makes feasible ways for searching your dream persons with fine qualities. It provides methods for identifying your life partner or soul mate as soon as possible to develop long distance relationships. If you are looking for a special one in life, then, choose services from a tattoo website that exactly fulfill your needs. You can find a perfect match quickly to plan your future life. Generate an account today for writing a new chapter in your romance, love or relation book to get recognition from others.

Tattoo Lovers

The online free dating website for tattooed singles will allow you to identify a person rightly to start your journey based on the choices. It even gives ways for browsing pictures and profiles of members from different walks of life. In fact, you can share your common interests with them to build your relationships. Get more information on the website to date multiple persons at one place. As a member, you can focus more on meeting your loved ones in a destination for knowing each other. Moreover, it is possible to collect some other details such as tattoo contests and parlor directory from the same website for meeting your exact needs. Updated news on events and services are available from a tattoo dating site that lets you make a right decision in relationships. Read the reviews and testimonials from the internet to learn about the ideas involved in dating. Pick your tattoo companion from the website that brings more pleasure in your life.

Tattoo health and safety tips Don’t drink before you ink, and eight other tips

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I’m often surprised to hear my patients say that they got their tattoos while they were intoxicated. These confessions usually pour out spontaneously, prompted by anxiety, as I prepare to insert a needle for medical reasons. Getting a tattoo may be exciting, but you shouldn’t get drunk and cloud your judgment before you get one.
Permanent tattoos have been growing in popularity (pop star Justin Bieber’s tattoos even have their own fan website). Twenty-one percent of all U.S. adults admit to having at least one tattoo, according to a Harris Interactive poll taken this year, up from the 14 percent of Americans who said so in 2008. Adults age 30 to 39 are most likely to have a tattoo (38 percent), and women are slightly more likely than men to have tattoos (23 percent vs. 19 percent).
No longer just the stigmata of sailors, prison inmates, and bikers, tattoos have gone mainstream, prompted in part by celebrity body art. Pop star Rihanna, who reportedly has 17, admits she gets “tattoo fever” when the impulse strikes. Singers Miley Cyrus and Selena Gomez, actors Johnny Depp, Colin Farrell, Angelina Jolie, and Brad Pitt, along with quite a few athletes have also flaunted their tattoos.

The health risks

But as tattooing has spread, so have the associated health risks—skin infections, allergic reactions, and blood-borne diseases. Recently in Rochester, N.Y., 19 patrons of a tattoo parlor were infected with the organism Mycobacterium chelonae, which causes a rash and bumps on the skin; left untreated, the bacteria can spread to the lungs. The tattooing was performed using premixed gray ink, manufactured in Arizona, that had been contaminated before distribution, according to a New England Journal of Medicine report. And outbreaks of MRSA (Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus) skin infections from commercially acquired tattoos have also been reported.
State and local authorities oversee tattoo practices, which vary considerably across the country. There is no standard regulation for training or licensing, and virtually no requirements for inspection, record-keeping, or informed consent. Although most states have laws prohibiting minors from getting tattoos, many teens nonetheless find them easy to get.
And almost anyone can put up a tattoo shingle. For example, in New York City, where tattoo parlors are not licensed, a tattooist can get a practitioner’s license after simply paying some fees and passing a three-hour infection control course.

Safer inking

In New York’s Westchester and Putnam counties, where I practice, tattoo shops are unregulated. leaving multiple opportunities for health dangers. Because the skin itself is teeming with organisms, if rigorous infection control practices are not used, it can become easily infected when pierced. If equipment or surfaces are improperly sterilized, or if needles are reused, it’s possible for viruses such as hepatitis to be transmitted from people who were tattooed earlier.
In addition, blood splatter can contaminate tattoo inks, which are often sold in more economical bulk containers. Sterile, single-use inks are available, but they are more expensive and rarely offered. Tattoo inks, which may be chemically complex and contain metals and solvents, are not regulated by the Food and Drug Administration. These inks may consist of azo pigments that not only contain multiple impurities, but are also used in car paint. Many of these pigments are illegal to use in cosmetics in Europe because they can break down into cancer-causing compounds, which may be absorbed into the skin.

If your mind is still set on a new tattoo, be sure to take these precautions.

  1. Find a tattoo artist who has single-use, “throw-away” kits that are individually packaged, dated, and sealed and hold disposable needles and tubes. Watch your tattoo artist remove the new needle and tube from its sealed envelope immediately before your session.
  2. Make sure that the tattoo parlor is fully licensed (if your state regulates tattoo parlors), and that your tattooist has a great deal of experience, even if that means driving across county lines to find a licensed shop.
  3. Make sure the artist wears sterile disposable gloves for each client and use sterile disposable towels, much as you’d expect from your dentist.
  4. Watch a procedure first to make sure that unsterile surfaces and equipment are not touched by the tattoo artist once the procedure has begun.
  5. Look for telltale signs of sloppy tattoo practices, such as blood splatter, dirty work surfaces, the absence of red “sharps disposal containers,” and a lack of infection-control practices.
  6. Ask where the ink was manufactured and procured. “It’s best if the ink comes from a large manufacturer that has been in business a long time, and even better if the artists have tried the ink on themselves,” says Byron Kennedy, M.D., deputy director of health for Monroe County, N.Y., and the lead author of the NEJM story. The contaminated ink in the recent outbreak came from a small retailer, he pointed out.
  7. Ask if the inks used are made of nonmetallic organic pigments.
  8. Consult a doctor if you see any sign of rash or infection (redness, swelling, or drainage of pus).

The Scientific Reasons You Should Definitely Date Someone With a Tattoo

By Kate Hakala February 26, 2015
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Bikers. Sailors. Convicts.
Tattoos have long been associated with the rebellious and the reckless, the irresponsible and the unprofessional. But today, tattoos aren’t the bold symbol or social statement they were a few decades ago. According to the Pew Research Center, nearly 4 in 10 millennials have a tattoo. Of those who do, about 50% have two or more. 
Tattoos are officially the new normal. That might be because getting inked does not signify living an unconventional lifestyle or having fringe values. In fact, tattoos indicate many wonderful qualities about a person, particularly in the context of relationships. 
Here are some reasons, according to science, that people with tattoos may actually be the greatest to date. 

1. Source: Getty
Since tattoos are so visible to the outside world (especially in the summer), they serve as compelling conversation starters. In fact, a 2013 study published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior that placed non-inked and tattooed women on a beach found that men were much more likely to approach women sporting tattoos. In the study, it took the men an average of 11 minutes less to approach the inked women. The study also concluded, “Men estimated to have more chances to have a date and to have sex on the first date with tattooed” participants. 
Not only do people make assumptions that those with tattoos might be more willing to talk to a stranger, but tattoos are a conversation piece for that opening line — “Where’d you get that?” or “Nice tattoo. What’s it mean?”  

“If a girl is attracted to me, it’s definitely a great topic,” Mark Fuentes, a Massachusetts-based tattoo artist, said to Mic.

2. While getting tattoos isn’t necessarily compulsive or irresponsible, studies have shown that people who get inked are more prone to risk-taking. While some risky behaviors are less desirable than others, an adventurous person can bring all sorts of benefits to a relationship.
“I have nine tattoos so far and I have dated two women with tattoos. I do find women, and a handful of men, with tattoos attractive. There’s something kind of cool and wild about them that I guess I don’t see in myself,” explains Ryan, 26, to Mic.
And that “wildness” and openness to new experiences means they’re more likely to find unexpected opportunities in relationships.

3. Source: Getty
“I think it shows a certain bravery, and overall badassness,” Fuentes says of when he first sees somebody with a tattoo. Indeed, a tattoo might mark someone as brave and confident. And confidence pays off in relationships — a person with more confidence feels less insecure and more trusting. 
A 2011 study discovered that tattooed men and women reported high self-esteem, low appearance anxiety and high body appreciation in three weeks after getting their tattoos. 
As Fuentes put it to Mic, “Do tattoos have the power to effect the perception of every single person you meet or even just sees you? Yeah.”
A small survey conducted by therapist John D. Moore found that 85% of the women surveyed viewed men with tattoos as more fun, and 68% associated them with confidence. In fact, OkCupid co-founder Christian Rudder analyzed what makes people appear attractive on the dating site and found that women garner interest by playing up what makes them unique. Tattooed women “show off what makes them different, and who cares if some people don’t like it. And they get lots of attention from men,” he concludes.
This level of confidence and self-awareness might translate to a more liberal attitude towards sex. A 2012 study from the Journal of Sexual Medicine found that people with tattoos usually have their first sexual encounter at an earlier age and had sex more frequently than their non-tatted counterparts. While the study confirmed that tattoos weren’t associated with risky sexual behaviors, the study suggests tattooed people are open sexually and might sooner act on those desires.

4. Source: Getty
Tattoos inevitably send all sorts of messages out to the world. Whereas historically tattoos were used to mark ourselves as part of a tribe or community, their messages are now more personal. Professor Nicholas Thomas, Director of the Museum of Archeology and Anthropology at Cambridge University, told CNN that “body art is becoming the opposite of conformity, a sort of badge of travel, or internationalism. People visit places and make them parts of themselves, so that they will forever bear marks of their unique visit.”
He added, “Our identities are far more particular, linked to our interests, affinities to cultural or spiritual traditions, tastes in music, and subcultural allegiances. The tattoo has become a vehicle for that sort of particular identification.”
Using a visible mode of expression contributes to the perception of tattooed people as being more open and unguarded. For some, a tattoo can indicate a generosity of spirit. “A tattoo allows me to permanently express myself and hold a moment forever. My tattoos are a bouquet of memories that I’ve shared with people I love, people I used to love, and most importantly, memories with myself,” said Kristin Collins Jackson on Bustle. 
Ryan sees tattooed people as ready to share more stories and share their own “cultural beliefs.” And science has shown that self-disclosure and free expression are the cornerstones of intimacy.
Since tattoos are almost always symbolic of something else, they can also indicate depth. “Personally, I always have a sense of ‘there’s more to this person than I think’ when I see a tattoo. Tattoos are commitments. In a way, it’s a commitment to standing for something for the rest of your life,” explains Susan, 26, who tends to date tattooed guys. 
And who isn’t looking for more signs of commitment when dating?
*Some names have been changed.
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7 Things To Know About Dating A Woman With Tattoos, Because She Doesn’t Believe In Regret

Amanda Chatel
@angrychatel

2 months ago Lifestyle I got my first tattoo when I was 18. It was a silly little thing: A daisy on the inside of my ankle. Daisies were and are my favorite flower, so in my 18-year-old mind a daisy on my ankle, for all eternity, seemed like a brilliant idea. Since then, despite absurd opinion pieces branding tattooed women as “broken,” I’ve gotten over 15 more ― tattoos, not daisies. I have literary tattoos of Fitzgerald and Hemingway quotes on my left arm, an Anais Nin quote on my rib cage, a half sleeve that’s inspired by a Vladimir Nabokov book cover, my dog’s name (because of course!), and a few more. I’m officially a tattooed girl.

As a woman with a bunch of tattoos, I find that a lot of stereotypes come a long with it. A man sees my arms all tattooed up and, if he’s the type of guy who doesn’t have any tattoos himself, he thinks I’m some sort of badass rebel, which is hardly the case once you take into consideration that I’m a walking ad for J.Crew and I wear pearl earrings from Tiffany. But as a woman who has committed herself to a lifetime of ink (and I’m hardly done, much to my mother’s disappointment), I do like to think that myself, and other women like me, are special in our own way because of our ink. Here are seven things to know about dating a woman with tattoos, aside from the fact that we’re sexy as hell.

1. She Plays By Her Own Rules

Although tattoos are far more mainstream than they ever were, it doesn’t make our individuality any less significant. And, honestly, I rarely run into women with as many tattoos as me. A woman with tattoos doesn’t care about fitting in, running with the pack, or playing by the rules others have written for her. She’s one of a kind in her thoughts and her actions. Who wouldn’t want to date a woman like that?

2. She’s Confident

It takes a certain brand of confidence to walk into a tattoo shop and ask to be inked with something ― anything at all, to be honest. A 2011 study found that both men and women, after getting a tattoo, had “significantly lower appearance anxiety … and significantly higher body appreciation, distinctive appearance investment, self-ascribed uniqueness, and self-esteem.”
Dating someone with healthy levels of self-esteem will not only make for a healthy relationship, but, if you’re the type who needs help in that area, you can maybe get some pointers.

3. She’s Not Afraid Of Taking Risks

Does this mean she’s going to jump out of a plane every chance she gets? Probably. I kid! But in all seriousness studies have found that people with tattoos are more likely to take risks, which also means, even if you’re not a risky sort, you’ll always have fun with her.

4. She’s Not Scared Of Pain

This isn’t to suggest each and every one of us wants to be locked up in some Red Room of Pain, but it does mean that we stare pain down and shrug it off. In other words, you break our heart, we’ll recover. However, the jury is still out on your recovery time.

5. She Doesn’t Waver In Her Beliefs

While her anti-conventionalism may keep her from wanting to get hitched or signing up for happily ever after with you, because face it, you’re probably not as awesome as any tattoo she has, an inked woman isn’t afraid to assert her conviction and stand by it. She’s committed to things and doesn’t bow out when things get tough or shaky.

6. She’s A Walking Conversation Starter

If you’re the type of person who dreads going to a party because you’ll have nothing to say, then you need to date a woman with tattoos. Although not every single woman gets a tattoo with some deep meaning to it, studies have found that men, especially, just love to approach women with tattoos and give them 30 questions. People also love to ask, “Did that hurt?” Yes, dumbest question of all time, but it never fails to get a conversation started.

7. She Doesn’t Believe In Regret

Although we’re asked over and over, “What if you regret your tattoos someday?” the fact we don’t worry about such things. You don’t get a tattoo with the notion of someday no longer wanting it; you get a tattoo because it’s a beautiful piece of self-expression. You should never regret expressing yourself. In the words of Edith Piaf, “Non, je ne regrette rien,” and that goes for all areas in our life, not just our tattoos.
Images: Crysco Photography/Flickr; Giphy(7)

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Got Tats? Find Out What Women REALLY Think Of Your Ink
By Amanda Chatel
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Love ’em? Dealbreaker? What kinds are never OK? Women reveal how they feel about your ink.
Tattoos are more common than they’ve ever been. Once something that only sailors and bikers sported, these days tattoos can be found on the least likely of men. It was pretty surprising when I found out my father’s straight-laced accountant had a full sleeve of tattoos, but I guess with everyone and their mother getting them, I really shouldn’t have been so shocked.
We’re looking at how ladies feel about guys with tattoos. As with everything, we have some strong opinions on the topic, and received confirmation that tribal armbands really are the worst of the worst.
Tattoos are great, but only when the body is great that goes along with it

“I can’t help myself when a guy has an inner arm tattoo. Some sort of word or phrase. Helps if their arm is in good shape,” says Steph, 24.
“I love tattoos on guys my age, but I can’t help but think about how those arm tattoos are going to look when they’re in their fifties when muscle tissue breaks down and things start to sag,” says Kathleen, 30.
The big no-nos
“The more, the better. So long as they are tasteful. I mean, no Disney characters, PLEASE,” says Tanya, 35.
“Tattoos are lovely! No tribals though … no tribals! It’s cool when the tats actually have a story behind them,” says Sabrina, 26.
“Tattoos are good, no tattoos are also good. As long as they aren’t actually offensive or anything, I don’t mind them at all,” says Elizabeth, 27.
Love what Elizabeth said. If he does have tattoos they should be tasteful, artful, thoughtful … not corny and common. If he doesn’t have tattoos, that’s fine too. Not particularly attracted or not attracted to them. But yeah, definitely no tribal tattoos,” says Min, 25.
But some of us think tattoos are actually boring
“Tattoos on guys are boring for me since everyone has them. I like a guy that doesn’t give a f*ck about what he looks like, and isn’t all vain and into tats. Not giving a sh*t about tats is most attractive IMO,” says Kate, 33.
And of course, the traditionalists would rather go without
“No tattoos on boys. Never ever, ever. While I sometimes find guys with awesome tats smoking hot, I am far too painfully traditional to ever seriously date someone with a lot of tattoos,” says Megan, 28.
While the tattoo conversation still continues on Facebook and Twitter, it’s clear to see that  you can’t please everyone with your tats. Like most things, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so the same goes for tattoos. You may think it’s cool and artistic, but that doesn’t necessarily mean every women you meet feels the same way.
But one thing’s for sure: just say no to tribal stuff.

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Workplace tattoo taboos fading

Lynn Monty, Burlington (Vt.) Free Press 3:02 p.m. EDT September 11, 2014
Shan Reil of Milton, an accounts receivable process specialist at Fletcher Allen Health Care, says his tattoos are no problem at work.(Photo: LYNN MONTY/FREE PRESS)

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BURLINGTON, Vt. — Hints of a tattoo peeked from beneath the sleeve of a plaid button-down shirt – casual work attire for Richard Bailey, 45. He’s been employed with the City of Burlington for 15 years, recently having taken on the job of facilities and events coordinator.
Bailey has worked in diverse capacities, including with kids in an after-school program at a teen center. The bicep tattoos that extend on both sides to his chest have never been cause for concern in his profession, he said.

Stephanie Shohet, 42, of Burlington is office manager at North End Studios in Burlington. (Photo: LYNN MONTY/Free Press)
As tattoos grow in popularity they are gaining acceptance in the workplace. But there are still some employers with rules against visible tattoos, and professions that frown on the trend even though there are no explicit bans. The result: Some workers show off their tats and others never get them or have them removed to avoid anything that could ding a job search or career.
Bailey has lived with his ink for two decades, as have many like him. Whatever the reason a person decides to get a tattoo, the art will remain embedded in the skin through life — and job — changes.
Will an image beloved at the age of 20 stand the test of time?
A youthful fashion
About 73 percent of people get their first tattoo between 18 and 22 years of age, and an estimated 40 percent of Millennials have a tattoo, according to a Pew Research Center report.

USA TODAY

tarbucks may lift workers’ visible tattoo ban

The Millennial Generation, also known as Generation Y, follows Bailey’s Generation X.
Gen X-ers were born from the early 1960s to the early 1980s. Millennials were born from the early 1980s to the early 2000s.
Burlington is an open-minded place and culturally progressive, Bailey said. In the past two decades there has been a huge cultural shift as far as accepting tattoos. Having them doesn’t necessarily impede career success, he’s found.

Richard Bailey, 45, of Hinesburg has worked for the city of Burlington in a few capacities including running an after school program. He has tattoos on each bicep that extend to his chest, that have not hurt his career, he said. This tattoo of a dragon was done in Burlington in the early 1990s. (Photo: LYNN MONTY/Free Press)
Twenty years ago Bailey worked in the social services sector. If he wore a tattoo-revealing, short-sleeved shirt back then, he admits people would give him an odd look or two.
“There was more prejudice toward it back then,” Bailey said. “Now there is really none of that here in Vermont anymore. Today half the people in the department have tattoos.”
Bailey’s work with the city is based on interactions, not appearances, he said. “It has been organic,” he said. “Having tattoos and being an old punk rock musician is part of that.”

The boss has a tattoo

In a Careerbuilder.com survey, 31 percent of human resource managers said visible tattoos could have a negative impact on their decision whether to hire someone, but bad breath weighed even heavier in the survey. Employees with chewed fingernails and dark suntans were offered fewer promotions, the survey said.
“For centuries most businesses have vigorously defended their traditional right to set and enforce dress and appearance standards for employees,” said Joseph O’Grady, professor of business at Burlington’s Champlain College. “But, the 21st century has brought lots of changes in social norms.”
For example, journalist and former executive editor of The New York Times, Jill Abramson, has a New York Times-style “T” tattoo, among other visible body art. During a recent Out Magazine interview she wore a sleeveless ensemble and sported tats on each bicep.

The Juice Bar owner, Steph Steeves, 27, of Burlington (left) and employee Kaylee Archer, 27, of Burlington at work in the Burlington Town Center Mall on Sept. 9.  (Photo: LYNN MONTY/Free Press )
Tattoos and all, Abramson was the first female executive editor in the Times’ 160-year history, and in 2012, she was ranked number five on the Forbes list of most powerful women.
O’Grady said the issue of tattoos on the job is an interesting example of how business traditions, new social norms, and legal issues collide in the modern workplace.
In most cases employers can legally refuse to hire people with visible tattoos, O’Grady said. “Or they can require, as a condition of employment, that they be covered while at work.”
Which is exactly what Shan Reil, 44, does. He is an accounts receivable process specialist for Fletcher Allen Health Care who wears a suit and tie every day, which keeps the tattoos on his arms, back, and chest covered.
His tattoos have never been an issue in his career at the hospital, Reil said.

Some companies more tat-tolerant than others

Vermont enjoys a fairly relaxed business climate, O’Grady said. “I am not aware of any employers with blanket policies banning visible tattoos,” he said. “Our business culture tends to be more accepting of differences than many other states. And our traditionally low unemployment rate and competitive job market means employers try to avoid setting unnecessary barriers for applicants.”
There are three underlying concerns employers have with hiring people with body art, O’Grady said. They are:
— the belief that an employee will not be taken seriously by tradition-minded clients;
— the concern that the organization’s brand or image might be compromised by outlandish tattoos;
— and the concern that one person’s body art could be perceived as offensive or hostile to a co-worker or customer.
O’Grady’s advice is to “feel out” prospective employers’ preferences before applying – to visit the workplace and scout out the dress and appearance practices and look up some current employees on LinkedIn. Simple observations can indicate whether individual expression is encouraged in that workplace or not, he said.

Stephanie Shohet, 42, of Burlington teaches a Forza class at North End Studios in Burlington. (Photo: LYNN MONTY/Free Press file)
Stephanie Shohet, 42, has full sleeve tattoos that cover her arms from wrist to neck. She is office manager at North End Studios in Burlington, and a popular fitness instructor there. She’s also worked part-time in the Burlington School district for a decade.
Most of Shohet’s tattoos carry meaning, from images of ivy and butterflies that remind her of her teenage daughters, to musical notes of a “Fiddler on the Roof” song for her parents, to a commemoration of running her first marathon.
Shohet began getting body art at 18 years of age. She has no regrets. “People know me,” she said. “I am front and center here, and it’s not a problem for anyone.”

Tattoo regret can be expensive

While Shohet has no regrets, Di Moda Salon owner Ellie Trono, 44, has a few. She is in the process of having a sun tattoo removed. She likes the art, but is not happy with its placement on her back. “Half of it peeks out of my shirt,” she said. “My thought was that it would only be seen if I wanted it to. Wrong.”
Other tattoos Trono is thinking of having removed have been on her body for more than twenty years. “I’m over them, and I don’t want them anymore,” Trono said.

USA TODAY
Unregulated rise of medical alert tattoos stirs debate

The cost of removal is much higher than having a tattoo inked. A $100 tattoo costs $1,000 to remove, Trono said.
Trono often visits Don Baker, owner of Laser Tattoo Removal of Vermont in South Burlington. Baker sees a number of people who simply outgrow their body art.
“We mature and change,” Baker said.
The bulk of his business comes from professional women in their 30s and 40s. They might be role models in their communities now, for their children, and they don’t want their children getting tattoos. Or sometimes it’s just because the artwork isn’t that great, Baker said.
Of the 45 million U.S. residents with tattoos in 2013, about 17 percent regret getting them, according to a Pew Research Center survey.
Most people love their tattoos, Baker said. But some things that happen in Vegas come home to Vermont and have to be removed. Names of past loves, and ring tattoo removals are big in his business.
Baker also sees a steady stream of medical students. “If your tattoo gets in the way of food, clothing, and shelter, it’s gone,” he said. “These folks just want to be taken seriously and appear more professional.”
Young men and women who want to join the military are also part of Baker’s clientele.
Vermont National Guard State Public Affairs Officer Maj. Chris Gookin said tattoos are not allowed on the face, head, neck or hands, and sleeve tattoos on the arms or legs are not authorized in the Guard.
Mary Alger, 46, of Fletcher has some advice for Millennials thinking of getting ink. “What seems like a great idea now might not be one later.”
Alger has six tattoos and regrets many of them. She’s a production supervisor at a coffee company. “I don’t think they affect what I do, but if I wanted something more at the company, it might matter,” she said.

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6 Questions to Ask a Tattoo Artist Before You Hire Them
Posted by: TAM


for a majority of people, is a life changing decision. Once you get ink in your skin there is no coming back from it. Thus, there are quite a few things you should know before that first prick of the needle, because not knowing can result in an unpleasant (if not a prolonged, expensive) experience.
For both new and experienced people who get tattoos, there are some questions you must ask to gauge the competency of the tattoo artist that is going to be working on you. In this blog, we are going to cover six of the most important questions you must ask a tattoo artist before you hire them to make a tattoo on you.

Ask About the Artist’s Qualification

Whether you’re getting something custom designed or a piece of flash, it is the artist’s skill and experience that will ultimately determine the quality of your body art. It is always worth your while to compare artists, shops and pricing, but keep in mind that when it comes to tattoos, you get what you pay for! Keeping all this in mind, asking about an artist’s skill level and experience are questions most people hesitate to ask because they fear the artist won’t consider it a question, but rather a challenge. Realistically though, if an artist is reactive to this question, it could be a strong indicator that they are more than a little uncomfortable with their own quality of work and/or experience, even if their tone is one of authority. Don’t be shy, this is for life- dig in and ask your artist for both their qualifications and  work history. A good tattoo artist has great pride in their work, and when asked, they will confidently show you their qualifications as well as their experience in the field of tattoo artistry. Overcompensation is one thing, for sure, but if the artist responds in a sketchy way, it is a red flag. And you shouldn’t ever JUST go by their sense of confidence (it can be faked), their actual tattoo work however cannot be…

Ask For Their Portfolio

If you want to gauge what a tattoo artist is capable off, you will need to see some of his past work for yourself. The best way to do so is to ask for the photo album of his work on customers. This portfolio will serve as a proof that the artist can deliver the level and quality of work you are expecting. And look carefully, making sure the images in their book are actual photographs. There’ve been plenty of sub-par tattooers out there busted cutting pictures out of magazines and stuffing their portfolios with work from other artists. (If you’d like some more tips on portfolios, read here- How to Examine Portfolios)

Ask Whether They Abuse Drugs At Work

This is a difficult question to ask a person you’ve only just met, but it is a legitimate one. You don’t want the person that’s tattooing you to be hopped up on drugs, increasing their chances of making a mistake on the only canvas you’ll ever have. At the same time, don’t fall in to the trap stereotyping- it is recommended that you to ask this question only when you witness something questionable in or around the vicinity of the studio or are aware of an artist’s reputation around town. You want a sober artist, for sure.

Ask If They Sterilize Their Tattooing Equipment

Sterility should be you primary concern when you decide to get a tattoo for the first time or when changing tattoo artists. Ask and check to see if the artist takes proper measures to sterilize the equipment. If the studio happens to have an autoclave, it is no guarantee that it is operational. Ask to see their current (monthly) spore testing report, which verifies the proper effectiveness of each unit. These tests are inexpensive and mandatory practices for most states by the health departments who issue artists licenses, all to ensure your safety.

Ask If They Practice Proper Disposal Protocols

After sterility, your next focus needs be on hygiene. First, the artist should be using disposable items like latex gloves,  barrier film, bags on all their machines and equipment, etc. Every single thing that comes into contact with blood or an artist’s gloves should be covered for protection and disposed of after each tattoo. Nothing should ever go back into its original container; this includes the ink, water and ointment. After a tattoo, the needle bars should be immediately placed in a covered sharps container for pick up and incineration by an outside waste disposal organization. Look for the biohazard waste receptacles, too.

Ask About Aftercare

Aftercare is also important! You won’t believe the number of tattoo studios in America that ignore this step all together, imagining that people already know how to care for a fresh tattoo. The artist should use proper first aid methods to clean your tattoo and provide proper bandaging along with some care instructions. If you don’t know and you weren’t told how that particular artist recommends you care for your new tattoo, here’s a good article on the basics – How to care for your new tattoo.
For your own safety, remember to ask your tattoo artist the questions above. It will give you much needed peace of mind before you get on the table and allow them to work on you.
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